Thursday, August 21, 2014

Justice: law and order

NYTimes: TV Habits? Medical History? Tests for Jury Duty Get Personal http://nyti.ms/1qrCuWL

My Washing Machine Diet and how it has finally liberated me. — Pause, often. — Medium

My Washing Machine Diet and how it has finally liberated me. — Pause, often. — Medium



Now before you get all judgmental about my diet, let me state my case. I
cannot tolerate spice so don’t touch it, I turned vegetarian in 2003, I
don’t drink coffee, I mostly eat at home, I avoid extreme heat or
hunger, I’m not overweight by any scale, and I earnestly start my day
with two glasses of warm water and an apple. Phew! I really am doing my
part here.

Tune into Musical History Books

AbeBooks: The History of Music Genres



The
origins of blues, rock, jazz, country and hip hop have all been
explored by musical historians. Pioneering musicians often overcame many
challenges before their music was heard and these tales are worth
telling.


The music that shapes your soul can shape your reading too.

If the sports world is truly going to house gender equality, we need to give girls the freedom to choose their sports

Mo’Ne Davis Is Just The Beginning — The Cauldron — Medium

Delivery Start-Ups Are Back Like It’s 1999 - NYTimes.com

Delivery Start-Ups Are Back Like It’s 1999 - NYTimes.com



The question comes down to how much people are willing to pay to be
lazy. To economists, laziness isn’t necessarily a bad thing. To the
sympathetic onlooker, these companies could be a step on the path to the
world prophesied by John Maynard Keynes (and even “The Jetsons”), in
which technology advances to the point that chores are replaced by
leisure time. But even this suggests a gloomy outcome: On-demand
delivery could create a two-tier economy — the people who can afford to
hire others to do their errands and the people who do them. That is,
unless Amazon succeeds in automating grunt work out of existence. (It
already has robots that pick items off shelves and pack them in boxes;
it wants to have a fleet of delivery drones.)



Despite the early demise of Rewinery and the shrunken ambitions of
others, such as eBay Now, similar start-ups with names like Caviar,
SpoonRocket and DoorDash have raised half a billion dollars in
investment in the last year, according to CB Insights, which tracks
venture capital. Even Louis Borders, the founder of Webvan (as well as
the Borders bookstore chain, another Internet casualty), is at work on a
grocery delivery start-up. Uber is using the $1.4 billion

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

From fission to fusion: the need for a quick transition | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

From fission to fusion: the need for a quick transition | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists



Yale's Jason Parisi makes a compelling case for fusion power, and
explains why fusion is cleaner, safer, and doesn't provide opportunities
for nuclear smuggling and proliferation. The only downside will be the
transition period, when there are both fission and fusion plants
available and the small amount of "booster" elements (tritium and
deuterium) found in fusion power could provide would-be proliferators
what they need to boost the yield of fission bombs: "The period during which both fission and fusion plants coexist could be dangerous,
however. Just a few grams of deuterium and tritium are needed to
increase the yield of a fission bomb, in a process known as 'boosting.'"
Details about current research into fusion power and an exploration of
relative costs make fusion power seem like the answer to a civilization
trying to get away from fossil fuels.

Attacking Ebola with nanoparticles | iSGTW

Attacking Ebola with nanoparticles | iSGTW



There is no known vaccine, treatment, or cure for Ebola, which is contracted
through contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person or animal. That
doesn’t mean there’s no hope, however. In fact, Thomas
Webster’s lab at Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, US,
is currently working on one possible weapon for fighting the virus:
nanotechnology.

Supercomputers reveal mouth bacteria can change its diet | iSGTW

Supercomputers reveal mouth bacteria can change its diet | iSGTW



According to new research published in the journal mBio, mouth
bacteria drastically change how they act when you're diseased. Scientists
say these surprising findings may lead to better ways to prevent or even
reverse gum disease, diabetes, and Crohn's disease.

Birds igniting: California solar power plant scorches birds in mid-air (+video) - CSMonitor.com

Birds igniting: California solar power plant scorches birds in mid-air (+video) - CSMonitor.com



“Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a
name for birds that fly through the concentrated beams of solar energy
focused upward by the plant’s 300,000 mirrors — ‘streamers,’ for the
smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair.”

Be First to Discover Apps with Product Hunt Notifications for Slack, Email, Pushbullet and More · Updates - Zapier

Be First to Discover Apps with Product Hunt Notifications for Slack, Email, Pushbullet and More · Updates - Zapier



Product Hunt is a daily curated list of recently released apps ranked in
order of upvotes by its tech-loving community. The site offers a
one-line app description, link to the app's website and a place to
discuss the app with fellow Product Hunters, often including the app's
creator.

Chinese Hackers Stole Info on 4.5 Million U.S. Hospital Patients | Re/code

Chinese Hackers Stole Info on 4.5 Million U.S. Hospital Patients | Re/code



Community Health Systems, which operates 206 hospitals in 29 states,
most of them in rural communities, said today that it suffered a data
breach affecting the personal information of some 4.5 million patients.


In a regulatory filing
with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the hospital company
said it was attacked during April and June of this year by an “Advanced
Persistent Threat” group believed to be operating out of China.

Google’s 10 Zaniest Projects in the 10 Years Since the IPO | Re/code

Google’s 10 Zaniest Projects in the 10 Years Since the IPO | Re/code



Robot kites: Google invested in and ultimately acquired Makani Power



Calico: Late last year, Google launched a separate company, Calico, that early reports described as the company’s attempt “to solve death.”

For Big-Data Scientists, ‘Janitor Work’ Is Key Hurdle to Insights - NYTimes.com

For Big-Data Scientists, ‘Janitor Work’ Is Key Hurdle to Insights - NYTimes.com



The field known as “big data” offers a contemporary case study. The
catchphrase stands for the modern abundance of digital data from many
sources — the web, sensors, smartphones and corporate databases — that
can be mined with clever software for discoveries and insights. Its
promise is smarter, data-driven decision-making in every field. That is
why data scientist is the economy’s hot new job.



ClearStory Data, a start-up in Palo Alto, Calif., makes software that
recognizes many data sources, pulls them together and presents the
results visually as charts, graphics or data-filled maps. Its goal is to
reach a wider market of business users beyond data masters.



Trifacta makes a tool for data professionals. Its software employs
machine-learning technology to find, present and suggest types of data
that might be useful for a data scientist to see and explore, depending
on the task at hand.



Paxata, a start-up in Redwood City, Calif., is focused squarely on
automating data preparation — finding, cleaning and blending data so
that it is ready to be analyzed.

Fark misogyny ban: Drew Curtis wants to outlaw sexist, racist, and homophobic comments.

Fark misogyny ban: Drew Curtis wants to outlaw sexist, racist, and homophobic comments.



Fark founder Drew Curtis on the site’s new misogyny ban:
“Adam Savage once described to me the problem this way: if the Internet
was a dude, we’d all agree that dude has a serious problem with women.
We’ve actually been tightening up moderation style along these lines for
awhile now, but as of today, the FArQ will be updated with new rules
reminding you all that we don’t want to be the He Man Woman Hater’s
Club.”

Monday, August 18, 2014

Where Tech Is Taking Us: A Conversation With Intel's Genevieve Bell - NYTimes.com

Where Tech Is Taking Us: A Conversation With Intel's Genevieve Bell - NYTimes.com



Tech companies, in
their many guises, always tell stories about the future of the world.
You can see this 150 years ago, with state-sponsored events like the Crystal Palace Exhibition.
One-third of the population of England went to see the Crystal Palace.
They wanted to see what it meant to be English, a citizen of the
Commonwealth and a citizen of the future.
Q.
So when things change, people start looking for clues about themselves?

Google News Gives Publishers More Control Over How It Indexes Their Sites | TechCrunch

Google News Gives Publishers More Control Over How It Indexes Their Sites | TechCrunch



Content owners can also use the Publisher Center to update some basic
facts about their sites. This includes changing the site’s name or
making sure it’s labeled correctly (Blog, Satire, Opinion, etc.).

How to Be Polite — The Message — Medium

How to Be Polite — The Message — Medium



People silently struggle from all kinds of terrible things. They suffer
from depression, ambition, substance abuse, and pretension. They suffer
from family tragedy, Ivy-League educations, and self-loathing. They
suffer from failing marriages, physical pain, and publishing. 

Manjul Bhargava wins Fields Medal, considered Nobel Prize for maths

A professor who sees common thread in Sanskrit, music and mathematics | Business Standard News

U.S. firm helped the spyware industry build a potent digital weapon for sale overseas - The Washington Post

a shadowy world of lucrative spyware tools for sale to foreign security
services, some of them with records of human rights abuse.



U.S. firm helped the spyware industry build a potent digital weapon for sale overseas - The Washington Post



Martin J. Muench, turned out to be a former developer of computer
security tools who had long since turned to the darkest side of their
profession. Gamma Group, the British conglomerate for which Muench was a
managing director, built and sold systems to break into computers,
seize control clandestinely, and then copy files, listen to Skype calls,
record every keystroke and switch on Web cameras and microphones at
will.



Merely by playing a YouTube video or visiting a Microsoft Live service
page, for instance, an unknown number of computers around the world have
been implanted with Trojan horses by government security services that
siphon their communications and files. Google, which owns YouTube, and
Microsoft are racing to close the vulnerability.

Drone-vertising Has a Spinoff (Comic) | Re/code

Drone-vertising Has a Spinoff (Comic) | Re/code

Microsoft acknowledges issues in Windows 8.1 August Update, asks users to uninstall | WinBeta

Microsoft acknowledges issues in Windows 8.1 August Update, asks users to uninstall | WinBeta



"Open the Programs
and Features item in Control Panel, and then click View installed
updates. Find and then uninstall any of the following update that are
currently installed: 
KB2982791, KB2970228, KB2975719, KB2975331"

This polyglot Muslim woman now heads Sanskrit dept

This polyglot Muslim woman now heads Sanskrit dept

Nasreen is the first Muslim to have become the head of the Sanskrit
department in the 126 years of Allahabad University’s history.



Nasreen has received several prestigious awards, including Sahitya
Shree, Mahadevi Kiran Samman, Prayag Gaurav, Rashtriya Gaurav and Father
Kanil Bulke Award for her achievement in the field of Sanskrit.

A
few days back she was bestowed with the prestigious Janeshwar
Mishra Sanskrit Vidushi Samman by Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Akhilesh
Yadav at a function here in recognition of the services rendered by her
in developing the language.

For Its New Shows, Amazon Adds Art to Its Data - NYTimes.com

For Its New Shows, Amazon Adds Art to Its Data - NYTimes.com

Playing the Numbers in Digital Dating - NYTimes.com

Playing the Numbers in Digital Dating - NYTimes.com



Computerized
dating first appeared in class projects such as the “Happy Families
Planning Service” at Stanford in 1959, and emerged as a paid service in
1965 with Operation Match at Harvard and Project TACT (Technical
Automated Compatibility Testing) in New York City. These early systems
had singles fill out questionnaires, then converted their answers into
punch cards that were sorted by huge computers the size of small rooms
and then matched. 

Internet
dating began to take off in the 1990s through newsgroups and BBSs
(bulletin board systems), mailing lists, chat rooms and
questionnaire-based matchmaking services of increasing sophistication.
Match.com, one of the first online dating sites and now the largest,
went live in 1995. Hundreds followed, including Nerve Personals,
OkCupid, eHarmony, Chemistry.com and JDate.

Saint Robin — Matter — Medium

Saint Robin — Matter — Medium



Will Leitch was unimpressed with your Robin Williams RIP Tweets, and with Internet grieving in general. 



Written and directed by Bobcat Goldthwait, World’s Greatest Dad concerns
a high school teacher (played by Williams) who discovers that his son
has accidentally killed himself in a failed autoerotic asphyxiation
attempt. To spare himself and his son embarrassment, the father, a
struggling novelist, writes a dramatic suicide note

Genetecists' New Obsession with Pregnancy Isn't Bad for Women

Epigenetic and Pregnancy: Why It's Not Bad for Women | New Republic



It turns out the life choices men make could have an even greater impact on their children's genes.



After all, men make sperm their whole lives long, while women are born
carrying all the eggs they’ll ever release. That means that male
reproductive material has more time to react to toxins, junk food, and
the vicissitudes of adversity, and transmit the consequences to their
descendants by epigenetic means.

Friday, August 15, 2014

Thousand-robot swarm assembles itself into shapes | Ars Technica

Thousand-robot swarm assembles itself into shapes | Ars Technica



There is something magical about seeing 1,000 robots move when humans
are not operating any of them. And in a new study published in Science,
researchers have created just that. This swarm of 1,000 robots can
assemble themselves into complex shapes without the need for a central
brain or a human controller.


Self-assembly of this kind can be found in nature—from molecules
forming regular crystals and cells forming tissues, to ants building
rafts to float on water and birds flocking to avoid becoming prey.

How to save smartphone battery: Researchers charge it with sound | BGR

How to save smartphone battery: Researchers charge it with sound | BGR



As Science Alert informs us,
the researchers have been working on a prototype smartphone that can be
recharged using only the sound waves that we encounter every day when
walking down the street. 

The Front Lines of Ferguson «

The Front Lines of Ferguson «

Bits from the Data Store | The Gradient Flow

Bits from the Data Store | The Gradient Flow



Beyond just sharing data sets, RunMyCode lets researchers share the data and
computer programs they used to generate the results contained in their
papers. Sharing both data and code used in research papers are important
steps. (For complex setups, a tool like Vagrant can come in handy.) 

Watch the spread of mass incarceration throughout the US - Vox

Watch the spread of mass incarceration throughout the US - Vox



Even states with low overall incarceration rates can still be guilty of
racial disparities in enforcement. In fact, the states with the biggest racial disparities in marijuana arrests between blacks and whites are all in the Northeast and Upper Midwest, not in the South.

What are some of the most ridiculous proofs in mathematics? - Quora

(4) What are some of the most ridiculous proofs in mathematics? - Quora

Watch Netflix Watch You

How Procera Networks Analyzed Performance of Netflix Original Shows | Re/code



Netflix gathers a lot of data on what their customers watch, but they
rarely share it. Using deep packet inspection, Procera Networks, a
broadband monitoring company, was able to track (and publicize) information about what Netflix users were watching. Netflix didn't comment publicly, but did plug the leak.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Which young author-turned-director speaks more to China's youth?

Han Han and Guo Jingming: China's Most Intense Literary Rivalry | New Republic



the most memorable scenes from two of this summer’s biggest Chinese films.In The Continent, the new road-trip movie



In Tiny Times 3, the latest installment of the blockbuster series  

It's not too late to ditch the ad-based business model and build a better web

The Internet's Original Sin - The Atlantic



Don Marti uses the same set of Facebook earning numbers to
demonstrate that print newspapers make roughly four times as much money
in advertising as Facebook does in the United States.