Monday, December 05, 2016

Mathematical mysteries: The Barber's Paradox | plus.maths.org

Mathematical mysteries: The Barber's Paradox | plus.maths.org



Suppose you walk past a barber's shop one day, and see a sign that says


"Do you shave yourself? If not, come in and I'll shave you! I shave anyone who does not shave himself, and noone else."
This seems fair enough, and fairly simple, until, a little later, the
following question occurs to you - does the barber shave himself? If he
does, then he mustn't, because he doesn't shave men who shave
themselves, but then he doesn't, so he must, because he shaves every man
who doesn't shave himself... and so on. Both possibilities lead to a
contradiction.

The International Effects of a Trump Presidency | EBSCO post

The International Effects of a Trump Presidency | EBSCO post



Trump coverage is and will continue to be aggregated on the WPR website



uncertainty can have costs for international relations if it is allowed to linger, World Politics Review Editor-in-Chief Judah Grunstein wrote about this issue the morning after the election



Ellen Laipson looked at the big picture



implications of a Trump presidency for Egypt, Cuba and the United Nations. Other big-picture issues that we’ve covered in the context of the election’s outcome include U.S. national security policy, the rise of global populism, the fate of the liberal international order, and what the recent history of Latin America could teach us about the United States under Trump.

Friday, November 25, 2016

How Indians triumphed in America | The Economist

How Indians triumphed in America | The Economist



Readers keen to peek at the underbelly should buy “The Billionaire’s
Apprentice”, by Anita Raghavan, which was published in 2013. It is a
brilliant account of the insider-trading ring that led to the downfall
of Rajat Gupta, the former boss of McKinsey, a consulting firm.
Fittingly he was pursued by a much-admired prosecutor of Indian descent.



The Other One Percent: Indians in America. By Sanjoy Chakravorty, Devesh Kapur and Nirvikar Singh. OUP USA; 355 pages; $34.95 and £22.99.





Aravindhan Kannaiyan & Jeyamohan on Tamil to English to Tamil Translations: AR Venkatachalapathy & Annadurai

சலபதியின் ஆங்கிலம்

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Agile Prophecies Of Doctor Seuss

Agile Prophecies Of Doctor Seuss



When confronted with a plate of livid Green Eggs and Ham, the typical OnsiteCustomer
might just be repulsed off-site. But the ensuing chase scene has a
relevant angle for civilians: Sam I Am at no time advises his mark to
eat this strange breakfast because "it tastes good". Like any marketing
department, he advertises it in association with other irrelevant
status-symbols; houses, cars, goats.




Like the first Cat story, the ultimate goal is frequent iterations;
adding and subtracting elements from the Green Eggs and Ham experience,
until our anonymous customer finally accepts a release for consumption.
This is not good this is not right
My feet stick out of bed all night
But when I pull them in - oh dear!
My head sticks out of bed up here!

The New New Product Development Game

The New New Product Development Game




In today’s fast-paced, fiercely competitive world of commercial new
product development, speed and flexibility are essential. Companies are
increasingly realizing that the old, sequential approach to developing
new products simply won’t get the job done. Instead, companies in Japan
and the United States are using a holistic method—as in rugby, the ball
gets passed within the team as it moves as a unit up the field.


This holistic approach has six characteristics: built-in
instability, self-organizing project teams, overlapping development
phases, “multilearning,” subtle control, and organizational transfer of
learning. The six pieces fit together like a jigsaw puzzle, forming a
fast flexible process for new product development. Just as important,
the new approach can act as a change agent: it is a vehicle for
introducing creative, market-driven ideas and processes into an old,
rigid organization.


The Alchemical Four Chambered Heart & the Phantoms and Shadows of Fear

The Alchemical Four Chambered Heart & the Phantoms and Shadows of Fear



The four chambered heart consists of being fully centered (in our heart)
and actively maintaining a

  1. strong, 
  2. clear, 
  3. full, and 
  4. open heart.  


The four phantoms of fear are the instinctive responses to a sense of
danger to one’s existence physically, emotionally, mentally, or
spiritually. Over time, particularly during early childhood, patterns of
response are habitualized as spontaneous responses to all similar
situations. These responses fall into four categories—

  1. Fight, 
  2. Flight, 
  3. Freeze, or 
  4. Fawn3.


The four shadows are meaning making and behavioral responses that evolve
from the fear based four phantoms. The four shadows are:

  1. inferiority,
    often in the form of imagined victimization, 
  2. envy, often expressed
    through false entitlement, 
  3. resentment, often expressed in the unmet need
    to be rescued, and 
  4. apathy (not caring), often starting in some form of
    blaming.  


When you begin to feel like a victim, stop!

When you begin to feel entitled, stop!

When you begin to feel the need to be rescued, stop!

When you begin to feel the need to blame, stop!(Baker, 2003, 177)







  • Show up and be present without preconceived notions, while having the Ability to Take Action and Enforce Boundaries
  • The Ability to Assess, Analyze and Contain, while saying what is so when it is so, without blame or judgment
  • The Ability to Connect and Feel, while paying attention to what has heart and meaning.
  • The Ability to Initiate, Support and Create Order while being open to outcome

EBSCO Supports New Open Source Project | American Libraries Magazine

EBSCO Supports New Open Source Project | American Libraries Magazine



open source library services platform (LSP) aimed at transforming the technology academic libraries rely on.



injects a new dynamic into the competitive landscape of academic library
technology, pitting an open source framework backed by EBSCO against a
proprietary market dominated by Ex Libris, now owned by EBSCO archrival
ProQuest.



A layer of technical infrastructure—being created by commercial
developer Index Data—will provide core services, exposing APIs to
support functional modules that can be developed by any organization or
individual in any programming language.



EBSCO wants to accelerate the development of this open source platform
without encroaching on the relationships it has established with the
global community of integrated library system (ILS) providers.



EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS). This integration can take the form of
either using EDS as the primary patron interface for the ILS or using
the EDS API to produce article-level search results through the ILS.
EBSCO has worked with some of the global companies, such as SirsiDynix
and Innovative Interfaces

Products such as Semantic Scholar and Microsoft Academic could be a boon for scholars

New AI-Based Search Engines are a "Game Changer" for Science Research - Scientific American



 

Semantic Scholar,
from the non-profit Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence (AI2)
in Seattle, Washington, unveiled its new format at the Society for
Neuroscience annual meeting in San Diego.



The search engine first launched in November 2015, promising to sort and
rank academic papers using a more sophisticated understanding of their
content and context. The popular Google Scholarhas
access to about 200 million documents and can scan articles that are
behind paywalls, but it searches merely by keywords. By contrast,
Semantic Scholar can, for example, assess which citations to a paper are
most meaningful, and rank papers by how quickly citations are rising—a
measure of how ‘hot’ they are.



Computing giant Microsoft quietly released its own AI scholarly search tool, Microsoft Academic, to the public this May, replacing its predecessor, Microsoft Academic Search, which the company stopped adding to in 2012.

Microsoft’s academic search algorithms and data are available for
researchers through an application programming interface (API) and the Open Academic Society, a partnership between Microsoft Research, AI2 and others. 



Microsoft Academic provides useful (if less extensive) filters,
including by author, journal or field of study. And it compiles a
leaderboard of most-influential scientists in each subdiscipline. These
are the people with the most ‘important’ publications in the field,
judged by a recursive algorithm (freely available) that judges papers as
important if they are cited by other important papers.



combining the advantages of Google Scholar’s massive scope with the
more-structured results of subscription bibliometric databases such as
Scopus and the Web of Science, says Anne-Wil Harzing, who studies
science metrics at Middlesex University, UK, and has analysed the new product. “The Microsoft Academic phoenix is undeniably growing wings,”



AI2 aims to index all of PubMed and expand to all the medical sciences, says chief executive Oren Etzioni.



AI2 aims to create a system that will answer science questions, propose
new experimental designs or throw up useful hypotheses. “In 20 years’
time, AI will be able to read—and more importantly,
understand—scientific text,” Etzioni says.

Wally Lamb’s Latest Novel to Be Released Exclusively as Book App - The New York Times

Wally Lamb’s Latest Novel to Be Released Exclusively as Book App - The New York Times



Lamb’s
sixth novel, “I’ll Take You There,” which is being released next year
exclusively as a digital app by Metabook, a new e-book publishing
company for which Mr. Siman is the co-founder and publisher.Landing
a new work from Mr. Lamb is a major coup for Metabook, which was
founded last year and specializes in multimedia, interactive
storytelling.



Metabook is establishing itself as a serious player in the growing marketplace for book apps.



There
are obvious downsides to releasing a book exclusively as an app. “I’ll
Take You There” won’t be available in bookstores or even from e-book
retailers like Amazon or Barnes & Noble when it comes out next
spring. Instead, Mr. Lamb’s fans will have to buy it from the iTunes app
store, and it will work only on Apple devices.

Mr.
Lamb said that as a music and film lover, he was excited by the
prospect of enhancing a narrative with music, film clips and video.


When the first wave of enhanced e-books arrived a few years ago, most
stuck to areas like nonfiction, science, history and current affairs,
where add-ons like interactive graphics, audio and video clips and
enlargeable maps and photographs could help deepen readers’
understanding of the topic. Interactive children’s books have become
another booming genre, with everything from Dr. Seuss to an app based on
Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson & The Olympians series. 



Some
writers have created apps that allow readers to play a role in the plot
or become a character. Others have developed apps that deliver tailored
content depending on the reader’s geographic location.

A
few months ago, the British novelist Iain Pears released his
genre-bending novel “Arcadia” as an experimental app that allows readers
to toggle through 10 different characters’ story lines. It has been
downloaded more than 20,000 times, outselling the hardcover edition of
the novel.

Sunday, November 20, 2016

Jon Stewart on President-elect Trump, hypocrisy in America - YouTube

Jon Stewart on President-elect Trump, hypocrisy in America - YouTube





Why BMI Is a Big Fat Scam | Mother Jones

Why BMI Is a Big Fat Scam | Mother Jones



Body mass index is used to sell weight loss drugs, set
insurance premiums, and counsel patients. There's just one little
problem.

The End of Identity Liberalism - The New York Times

The End of Identity Liberalism - The New York Times



In recent years American liberalism has slipped into a kind of moral
panic about racial, gender and sexual identity that has distorted
liberalism’s message and prevented it from becoming a unifying force
capable of governing.



when it came to life at home, she tended on the campaign trail to lose
that large vision and slip into the rhetoric of diversity, calling out
explicitly to African-American, Latino, L.G.B.T. and women voters at
every stop.

New Delhi Tamil Sangam Elections

சங்கம்-2020: தில்லித் தமிழ்ச் சங்கத் தேர்தல்

Kenneth Rogoff: India’s Currency Exchange and The Curse of Cash

Kenneth Rogoff: India’s Currency Exchange and The Curse of Cash



Today in our blog series by Kenneth Rogoff, author of The Curse of Cash, Rogoff discusses the controversy over India’s currency exchange. Read other posts in the series here.

 


On the same day that the United States was carrying out its 2016
presidential election, India’s Prime Minister, Narendra Modi, announced
on national TV that the country’s two highest-denomination notes, the
500 and 1000 rupee (worth roughly $7.50 and $15.00) would no longer be
legal tender by midnight that night, and that citizens would have until
the end of the year to surrender their notes for new ones. His stated
aim was to fight “black money”: cash used for tax evasion, crime,
terror, and corruption. It was a bold, audacious move to radically alter
the mindset of an economy where less than 2% of citizens pay income tax, and where official corruption is endemic.

Friday, November 18, 2016

Old Hollywoods Forgotten Filmmaker - Arts - UTNE READER

Old Hollywoods Forgotten Filmmaker - Arts - UTNE READER



James Stuart Blackton was an innovator in the early days of Hollywood
but was unable to maintain success, constantly walking the line between
rich and poor. 



Buccaneer: James Stuart Blackton and the Birth of American Movies (Rowman
& Littlefield, 2016) by Donald Dewey exposes the man created the
first movie studio, adopted the system of making movie stars, and
pioneered film animation. This man was James Stuart Blackton, who not
only did all of the aforementioned but was also the first to yell
'action' and 'cut' while making movies. Despite all of the ground broken
by Blackton in the film industry he remains mostly unknown, even to
film enthusiasts and cinema scholars. This excerpt comes from the
introduction to Dewey's biography of Blackton and explains why Blackton
is not more notable.

Inside the Abortion Clinic - Politics - UTNE Reader

Inside the Abortion Clinic - Politics - UTNE Reader



The exam room at an abortion clinic is a safe place for women from all walks of life. 




Violation: Collected Essays (Hawthorne
Books, 2016) by Sallie Tisdale compiles 25 years worth of work from a
revered writer into a single volume. Tisdale's work has been described
as "thought-provoking and often controversial" by the
Library Journal and has been published in magazines ranging from The New Yorker to Esquire. This excerpt tackling abortions was originally published in Harper's Magazine.

Thursday, November 17, 2016

Kushner vs. Christie: This nasty Trump transition fight goes back a decade - CNNPolitics.com

Kushner vs. Christie: This nasty Trump transition fight goes back a decade - CNNPolitics.com



The Son-In-Law Rises: Jared Kushner's Influence In The Trump Camp : NPR



Under investigation at the time for
making illegal campaign contributions, Kushner targeted his
brother-in-law, William Schulder, a former employee turned witness for
federal prosecutors in their case against the Democratic donor.
In retaliation, Kushner hired a prostitute to
lure Schulder into having sex in a Bridgewater, New Jersey, motel room
as a hidden camera rolled. A tape of the encounter was then sent to
Kushner's sister and Schulder's wife, Esther.
Ultimately,
the intimidation stunt failed. The Schulders brought the video to
prosecutors, who tracked down the call girl and threatened her with
arrest. She promptly turned on Kushner.
Less than a year later, Christie announced the details of the plea deal.
In
its aftermath, Jared would take over his father's commercial interests,
purchase the weekly New York Observer newspaper, which he still owns,
and lead the Kushner Companies' $1.8 billion purchase of 666 Fifth
Avenue in 2007. That same year he would meet a young woman, also the
child of a controversial real estate mogul, named Ivanka Trump during a
business lunch

Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Andhimazhai: Bava Chelladurai: Sivakumar: Actor to Foundation Director

19. டி.எம்.சாரோனிலிருந்து...: கொங்கு நாட்டு எளிய சம்சாரி - அந்திமழை



நடிகர்
சூர்யாவும்
, கார்த்தியும் அவர்கள் ஒவ்வொருவரையும்,
கைகுலுக்கி, கைபிடித்து அழைத்துவந்து இருக்கைப்
படுத்திக் கொண்டிருந்தார்கள்
. அந்நிகழ்வின் நிறைவுரையை ஆற்ற நான்
அழைக்கப்பட்டேன்
.

முன்னகர்த்தப்பட்ட
ஒரு தனி நாற்காலியில் சிவக்குமார் சார் உட்கார்ந்திருந்தார்
.

பின்மெய்ப்பொருள்: பின் ஞானம்; பின் பொருள்; பின் அறிவு; எதார்த்தத்திற்கு அப்பால்

இவ்வாண்டின் சர்வதேசச் சொல் (ஆங்கில மொழி அகராதி) – மக்சுப்பன்ஸ்



‘Post-truth’ named word of the year by Oxford Dictionaries, The Guardian



Defined by the dictionary as an adjective “relating to or denoting
circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping
public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief”, editors
said that use of the term “post-truth” had increased by around 2,000% in
2016 compared to last year.”

Monday, November 14, 2016

Inequality Among Women Is Crucial to Understanding Hillary’s Loss | The Nation

Inequality Among Women Is Crucial to Understanding Hillary’s Loss | The Nation



Working class women who voted for Trump tell us a lot about feminism’s relationship to class politics.



 The
destruction that Bill Clinton’s policies wrought in now-depressed rural
areas in battleground states like Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania came
back to haunt Hillary. The residents of those regions, who are largely
white and working class, have been ravaged by the abandonment of major
industries and the social and economic ills that followed in its wake:
record low levels of labor-force participation, downward mobility, drug
epidemics, and more. In his reporting from Rust Belt cities in
southwestern Ohio and eastern Kentucky,

What the Hell Just Happened? – Medium

What the Hell Just Happened? – Medium

The Ars Technica science fiction bucket list—42 movies every geek must see | Ars Technica

The Ars Technica science fiction bucket list—42 movies every geek must see | Ars Technica

Saturday, November 12, 2016

President Trump’s First Term - The New Yorker

President Trump’s First Term - The New Yorker



When Trump talks about what he will create and what he will eliminate,
he doesn’t depart from three core principles: in his view, America is
doing too much to try to solve the world’s problems; trade agreements
are damaging the country; and immigrants are detrimental to it. He
wanders and hedges and doubles back, but he is governed by a strong
instinct for self-preservation, and never strays too far from his
essential positions. Roger Stone, a long-serving Trump adviser, told me
it is a mistake to imagine that Trump does not mean to fulfill his most
radical ideas. “Maybe, in the end, the courts don’t allow him to
temporarily ban Muslims,” Stone said. “That’s fine—he can ban anybody
from Egypt, from Syria, from Libya, from Saudi Arabia. He’s a
Reagan-type pragmatist.”

Hardline Leaders Congratulate Trump On Presidential Election Victory : NPR

Hardline Leaders Congratulate Trump On Presidential Election Victory : NPR



there is the Russian president, Vladimir Putin. And now Trump has
said that the U.S. should let Russia do the fighting in Syria. The
problem is of course that Russia is fighting to prop up the Syrian
regime that's bombing its own people.
There's the Hungarian president. His government has fenced off
its border with Serbia to keep out migrants. And that might sound a
little bit familiar. There's the president of the Philippines, who has
used obscenities to describe President Obama



quite a few of them believe that human rights and democracy aren't going
to be really high up on Trump's list of foreign priorities



Trump projects this himself of getting down to the real important
issues. And those things aren't questions of human rights and democracy
but more of security and migration of people and countering extremism.



Week In Politics: Presidential Election Aftermath : NPR



Trump Victory Casts Doubt Over Fate Of Iran Nuclear Deal : NPR


Friday, November 11, 2016

Autocracy: Rules for Survival | by Masha Gessen | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books

Autocracy: Rules for Survival | by Masha Gessen | NYR Daily | The New York Review of Books





Our political system, our society, our country itself are in greater
danger than at any time in the last century and a half. The
president-elect has made his intentions clear, and it would be immoral
to pretend otherwise. We must band together right now to defend the
laws, the institutions, and the ideals on which our country is based.”


That, or something like that, is what Hillary Clinton should have said on Wednesday. Instead, she said, resignedly,

We must accept this result and then look to the future. Donald Trump is going to be our president.



Rule #1: Believe the autocrat. He means what
he says. Whenever you find yourself thinking, or hear others claiming,
that he is exaggerating, that is our innate tendency to reach for a
rationalization. This will happen often: humans seem to have evolved to
practice denial when confronted publicly with the unacceptable. Back in
the 1930s, The New York Times assured its readers that Hitler’s anti-Semitism was all posture.



Rule #3: Institutions will not save you. It
took Putin a year to take over the Russian media and four years to
dismantle its electoral system; the judiciary collapsed unnoticed. The
capture of institutions in Turkey has been carried out even faster, by a
man once celebrated as the democrat to lead Turkey into the EU. Poland
has in less than a year undone half of a quarter century’s
accomplishments in building a constitutional democracy.



Rule #5: Don’t make compromises. Like Ted
Cruz, who made the journey from calling Trump “utterly amoral” and a
“pathological liar” to endorsing him in late September to praising his
win as an “amazing victory for the American worker,” Republican
politicians have fallen into line. Conservative pundits who broke ranks
during the campaign will return to the fold. Democrats in Congress will
begin to make the case for cooperation





Revenge of the Forgotten Class - ProPublica





These newly energized voters helped Trump flip not only battlegrounds
like Ohio and Iowa but long-blue Northern industrial states —
Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin — without which he would have lost to
Hillary Clinton. Nationwide, his margin with the white working class soared to 40 points, up 15 points from Romney’s in 2012.



When she addressed Clinton herself, it was in a stream that seemed to
refer to, but not explicitly name, several of the charges thrown against
Clinton by that point in time, including her handling of the deadly
2012 attack by Islamic militants on U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya;
the potential conflicts of interest at the Clinton Foundation; and her
use of a private email server while serving as Secretary of State,
mixing national security business with emails to her daughter, Chelsea.





Hand-wringing among Democrats about the party’s declining support among
white working-class voters goes back a long time, to Lyndon Johnson’s
declaration that signing the Civil Rights Act would sacrifice the
allegiance of white Southerners. Then came the rest of the historical
litany: the crime wave, riots and anti-Vietnam War protests of the late
1960s, the consolidation of suburban white flight, Nixon’s Silent
Majority, Reagan Democrats, NAFTA, gun control, the War on Coal, and on
and on. By this year, many liberals had gotten so fed up with hearing
about these woebegone voters and all their political needs that they
were openly declaring them a lost cause, motivated more by racial issues than economic anxiety,
and declaring that the expanding Democratic coalition of racial and
ethnic minorities and college-educated white voters obviated the need to
cater to the white working class.

US election results: The maps and analysis that explain Donald Trump's shock victory to become President

US election results: The maps and analysis that explain Donald Trump's shock victory to become President



Trump has pledged to be a president "for all Americans" after
being elected the 45th President of the United States, capturing crucial
victories over Hillary Clinton in a remarkable show of strength

How Half Of America Lost Its F**king Mind

How Half Of America Lost Its F**king Mind



explain the Donald Trump phenomenon in three movies. And then some text.


There's this universal shorthand that epic adventure movies use to
tell the good guys from the bad. The good guys are simple folk from the
countryside ...



See, political types talk about "red states" and "blue states" (where
red = Republican/conservative and blue = Democrat/progressive), but
forget about states. If you want to understand the Trump phenomenon, dig
up the much more detailed county map. Here's how the nation voted
county by county in the 2012 election -- again, red is Republican

Millennial voters would turn US blue? Viral map may be misleading

Millennial voters would turn US blue? Viral map may be misleading



SurveyMonkey confirms to CNET that the map is pre-election, from October, and it shows the results of a SurveyMonkey poll based on responses given by more than 30,000 likely voters aged 18-34. You can see a slightly updated version of it on the SurveyMonkey site.

Tuesday, November 08, 2016

The 2016 Election Exposes the Very, Very Dark Side of Tech | WIRED

The 2016 Election Exposes the Very, Very Dark Side of Tech | WIRED



The trolls were around since long before Donald Trump, but boy, did
Trump’s candidacy give them their day in the spotlight. Long confined to
the fringe, this year, the trolls took center stage, unleashing a
torrent of harassment on anyone who was not on the #TrumpTrain. They
proudly adopted the term Clinton used to describe them—“deplorables”—and
lived up to the name.


For conservative writer David French, this meant enduring a deluge of photos doctored to make his daughter look like a slave

‘Oh Man, I Guess We’ve Won This Thing’ - POLITICO Magazine

‘Oh Man, I Guess We’ve Won This Thing’ - POLITICO Magazine



The election of Barack Hussein Obama was a historic moment, and in
retrospect it seems like a certainty. Obama took just under 53 percent
of the vote over Senator John McCain, a share that wasn’t wildly out of
sync with the polls going into Election Day. But for the inner circle of
a candidate nothing is a lock until it happens. There’s uncertainty
about how many volunteers will “flake out” on Election Day, about the
weather forecast in tight states and even when the candidate should vote
to avoid any political embarrassment.




A win on Tuesday by Hillary Clinton would also be historic, but her
triumph as the first female president would be owed in large part to the
power of a political machine that has amassed a deep bench of talent
over decades.

Yes, Donald Trump, the FBI Can Vet 650,000 Emails in Eight Days | WIRED

Yes, Donald Trump, the FBI Can Vet 650,000 Emails in Eight Days | WIRED



FBI director James Comey has had a rough week or so: First he was accused of rigging the election for Donald Trump when he revealed on October 28 that the FBI was investigating new emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign, and now he’s accused of rigging it against Trump by revealing today that none of those new emails contained anything that would result in criminal charges

Thanglish Standup Comedy - American Elections - Karuthamma to Michelle Obama

Alexander Babu - American Super President - YouTube