Wednesday, March 22, 2017

In Trump’s Budget, America Comes Last | The Nation

In Trump’s Budget, America Comes Last | The Nation

Berry was a highly original and influential guitarist and as great a songwriter as rock and roll has ever produced

Remembering Chuck Berry | The Nation

The philosophers he influenced set the stage for the technological revolution that remade our world

How Aristotle Created the Computer - The Atlantic



The evolution of computer science from mathematical logic culminated in the 1930s, with two landmark papers: Claude Shannon’s “A Symbolic Analysis of Switching and Relay Circuits,” and Alan Turing’s “On Computable Numbers, With an Application to the Entscheidungsproblem.”

Iraqis Don’t Know Why You Say Goodbye—They Prefer to Say Hello - WSJ

Iraqis Don’t Know Why You Say Goodbye—They Prefer to Say Hello - WSJ



In the nation’s quirky
vernacular, which grabs words from many sources, ‘hello’ is used as a
parting protocol, leaving outsiders baffled; conversations end with 30
seconds of ‘hello, bye bye, hello, hello.’



The way some Iraqis say hello to mean goodbye is just one of many
peculiarities that make Iraqi Arabic unique among the Arabic dialects of
the Middle East. The vernacular here echoes a mishmash of historical
influences: ancient Islamic empires, British colonial rule and, more
recently, Western-style consumerism and the internet.

Words in
Farsi, a language most widely spoken in Iran, and Ottoman Turkish, the
language of the former Ottoman Empire, pepper daily discourse here.

Lynn Nottage’s play “Sweat” is a tough yet empathetic portrait of the America that came undone

The First Theatrical Landmark of the Trump Era - The New Yorker

Sunday, March 19, 2017

Remembering rock 'n' roll pioneer Chuck Berry

The Photo Desk on Flipboard

F-16s, Made in India | Foreign Affairs

F-16s, Made in India | Foreign Affairs



The country's fleet of MiG 21s is aging and increasingly prone to accidents, so it is seeking a replacement capable of air superiority and ground-attack missions. Initial reports suggested that the indigenously produced Tejas light combat aircraft (LCA) might play this role. 

How legal representation could come to resemble TurboTax

Rise of the Robolawyers



In the past year, more than 10 major law firms have “hired” Ross, a
robotic attorney powered in part by IBM’s Watson artificial
intelligence, to perform legal research. 



Beyond helping prepare cases, AI could also predict how they’ll hold up
in court. Lex Machina, a company owned by LexisNexis, offers what it
calls “moneyball lawyering.” It applies natural-language processing to
millions of court decisions to find trends that can be used to a law
firm’s advantage.

Nobel laureate, poet and playwright Derek Walcott dead, aged 87 | Books | The Guardian

Nobel laureate, poet and playwright Derek Walcott dead, aged 87 | Books | The Guardian



After graduating in 1953 he moved to Trinidad, an island recently
vacated by VS Naipaul, a contemporary of Walcott’s whose career advanced
in eerie synchronicity – from early dreams of a life in literature to
Nobel success. Naipaul was first to find a London publisher, Walcott
first to find favour with the Swedish Academy - but their contrasting
approach to the legacy of empire soured their early friendship, igniting a feud which reached its apogee when Walcott read out an attack in verse at the 2008 Calabash festival in Jamaica: “I have been bitten, I must avoid infection / Or else I’ll be as dead as Naipaul’s fiction.”

The World Changing Ideas Of 2017 | Fast Company

The World Changing Ideas Of 2017 | Fast Company



From global democracy to
creating a new fish-based food system, nine ideas that could change the
world for the better in 2017 and beyond.



we’ve collected nine big ideas–from replacing factory farms with fish farms to creating a true global democracy–that
can help us imagine the kind of world we can build once we elect
leaders who will enact the revolutionary changes necessary to create a
sustainable and more equitable future.



Climate writer Paul
Hawken’s new book offers a comprehensive–and not all that daunting–list
of exactly what we need to do to stop carbon emissions
. Companies are figuring out new ways to create circular economies and eliminate waste. Even Republicans are on board with renewable energy–as long as it’s the wind power that’s benefiting their states.When we unveil our first-ever World Changing Idea Awards on March 20

Why Is Silicon Valley So Awful to Women? - The Atlantic

Why Is Silicon Valley So Awful to Women? - The Atlantic



Tech companies are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to improve
conditions for female employees. Here’s why not much has changed—and
what might actually work.

The Great Millennial Meltdown

The Great Millennial Meltdown

Don’t Get Hacked. – Product Hunt – Medium

Don’t Get Hacked. – Product Hunt – Medium

Privacy Get a new virtual card for every transaction.

1Password for Teams Securely share information with your team.

Little Snitch Protect your private data from being sent out.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Why should the US spend money on foreign aid that could be spent at home instead? Here’s my answer

How Foreign Aid Helps Americans | Bill Gates

'Learn Better' Book Shows How to Learn New Things - The Atlantic

'Learn Better' Book Shows How to Learn New Things - The Atlantic



Learn Better,
author and education researcher Ulrich Boser digs into the neuroscience
of learning and shows why it’s so hard to remember facts like that one.
Boser explains why some of the most common ways we try to memorize
information are actually totally ineffective, and he reveals what to do
instead.Because we’re all getting dumber in the age of Google

Best Books to Help Your Career, Find a Job: Headhunter Picks | Money

Best Books to Help Your Career, Find a Job: Headhunter Picks | Money



The Art of Living: The Classical Manual on Virtue, Happiness, and Effectiveness



Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win 

co-authors Jocko Willink and Leif Babin  



Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future 

author Martin Ford.

 

Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike 

Nike founder Phil Knight 

Loneliness can be a shameful hunger, a shell, a dangerous landscape of shadowy figures. But it is also a gift

NYC blue: what the pain of loneliness tells us | Aeon Essays

Holi | Festival of Colors - LA Times

Holi | Festival of Colors - LA Times

How icebergs became a metaphor for something quite deep

Icebergs | The Point Magazine



Time-lapse videography has made the retreat of the world’s glaciers dramatically clear. James Balog, photographer for the award-winning 2014 documentary Chasing Ice
and director of the Extreme Ice Survey, calls ice “the canary in the
global coal mine … the place where we can see and touch and feel climate
change.” The film’s most dramatic sequence shows an iceberg the size of
lower Manhattan splitting and rolling off Greenland’s Ilulissat
Glacier. 

Facts by themselves probably won’t change your mind

This Article Won’t Change Your Mind - The Atlantic



in 1994, Siddha Yoga became the subject of an exposé in The New Yorker. The article
by Lis Harris detailed allegations of sexual abuse against Gurumayi’s
predecessor, as well as accusations that Gurumayi forcibly ousted her
own brother, Nityananda, from the organization. Shaw says he was already
hearing “whispers” of sexual abuse when he joined in the 80s, but “I
chose to decide that they couldn’t be true.”

Why the Internet has changed the nature of dictionaries

The Selfie-Taker and the Dictionary-Maker | Public Books



John Simpson was hired as an editorial assistant at the Oxford English Dictionary in 1976, he took on the task of documenting new meanings of old words. When was queen
first used to describe mattress sizes and women’s plus-size clothing?
Was its use for homosexuals originally an Australian invention? How and
when did Louis Pasteur’s aerobic work its way into a plural
noun for a kind of vigorous exercise? Such investigations require
patience and tenacity. As detection goes, they’re less redolent of
Sherlock Holmes than of Inspector Lestrade.
Simpson’s engaging memoir of his 37 years at the OED describes a period of unprecedented change.

Trump and the Oscars gaffe have something in common: Both lead some people to theorize we’re living in a Matrix-like simulation

Did the Oscars Just Prove That We Are Living in a Computer Simulation? - The New Yorker

Revenge of the copy editors: Grammar pros find internet stardom - Columbia Journalism Review

Revenge of the copy editors: Grammar pros find internet stardom - Columbia Journalism Review



Since last summer he has issued some 30 web commentaries; subjects have ranged from the traditional taboo about beginning a sentence with a coordinating conjunction to the utility of the word “impactful.”



McIntyre, the night content production manager at the Baltimore Sun,
is one of an increasingly visible and robust breed of public masters of
style and usage who have parlayed journalistic copy-desk expertise into
an enthusiastic online following. In an age of texting and tweeting,
these folks are trying to keep the mother tongue healthy

A Brief History of Facts | History Today

A Brief History of Facts | History Today



The rise of ‘the fact’ during the 17th century came at the expense of
the power of authority. Could the digital age reverse how we decide what
is true and what is not? 

Friday, March 17, 2017

Can you solve the chess problem which holds key to human consciousness?

Can you solve the chess problem which holds key to human consciousness?



In 1942, codebreakers at Bletchley Park, released a similar crossword puzzle
in the pages of The Telegraph in the hope of recruiting new
cryptographers, which played a crucial role in helping the Allies crack
Enigma and win the Second World war. Readers were asked to solve the
puzzle in 12 minutes.



The puzzle coincides with the launch of the new Penrose Institute,
founded by Sir Roger Penrose, emeritus Professor at the Mathematical
Institute of Oxford, who shared the World Prize in physics with Professor Stephen Hawking in 1988 for his work on black hole singularities.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Why Do Workers Quit? The Factors That Predict Employee Turnover - Glassdoor Economic Research

Why Do Workers Quit? The Factors That Predict Employee Turnover - Glassdoor Economic Research



  • Pay also
    matters for employee turnover. We find that a 10 percent increase in
    base pay raises the likelihood by 1.5 percent that the average employee
    will stay inside the company when moving to their next role, even after
    statistically controlling for factors like job title, industry, company
    size and location.
  • Finally, we find that job title stagnation
    hurts employee retention. Every additional 10 months an employee
    stagnates in a role makes them 1 percent more likely to leave the
    company when they finally move on to their next position.
Three
workplace culture factors had no impact on turnover: work-life balance,
senior leadership, and compensation and benefits ratings. Although these
factors matter for overall employee satisfaction, they don’t appear to
matter much for employee turnover

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Nanoscale logic machines go beyond binary computing

Nanoscale logic machines go beyond binary computing



Scientists have built
tiny logic machines out of single atoms that operate completely
differently than conventional logic devices do. Instead of relying on
the binary switching paradigm like that used by transistors in today's
computers, the new nanoscale logic machines physically simulate the
problems and take advantage of the inherent randomness that governs the
behavior of physical systems at the nanoscale—randomness that is usually
considered a drawback.




More information:
Barbara Fresch et al. "A Probabilistic Finite State Logic Machine Realized Experimentally on a Single Dopant Atom." Nano Letters. DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b05149






Tech company proposes edible drone to solve world hunger - The Verge

Tech company proposes edible drone to solve world hunger - The Verge



This drone could be built of honeycomb or compressed vegetables, with
salami serving as the landing gear, according to a new interview in the Financial Times

Ancient technique can dramatically improve memory, research suggests | Science | The Guardian

Ancient technique can dramatically improve memory, research suggests | Science | The Guardian



After spending six weeks cultivating an internal “memory palace”, people
more than doubled the number of words they could retain in a short time
period and their performance remained impressive four months later. The
technique, which involves conjuring up vivid images of objects in a
familiar setting, is credited to the Greek poet Simonides of Ceos, and
is a favoured method among so-called memory athletes. 

Pablo Larraín's 'Neruda' is a richly imagined biographical fantasia - LA Times

Pablo Larraín's 'Neruda' is a richly imagined biographical fantasia - LA Times



From the opening scene, a political gathering wittily set in an enormous
public lavatory, Neruda, a senator and member of the Chilean Communist
Party, is shown to be a proud and vociferous critic of his country’s
leadership. But in the very next sequence, a lavish party crammed with
half-naked revelers, the film presents the idea of Neruda as a Champagne
socialist — a vain, hedonistic hypocrite who, like so many left-wing
elites, loves “to soak up other people’s sweat and suffering.”



“Neruda’s” formal spryness and nontraditional appreciation of history
will come as little surprise to admirers of “Jackie,” Larraín’s other
great bio-experiment of the moment, or his 2012 drama, “No,” a
compelling snapshot of the end of the Augusto Pinochet regime that also
starred Bernal (with Gnecco and Castro in prominent supporting roles).
His filmography, which includes such festival-acclaimed favorites as
“Tony Manero,” “Post Mortem” and “The Club,” 



Unspooling the picture earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival, Larraín confessed that, even after making the movie, he wasn’t at all sure he knew who Neruda was. 

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

The Fate of the Critic in the Clickbait Age - The New Yorker

The Fate of the Critic in the Clickbait Age - The New Yorker



Last year, Timothy Mangan, who had been at the Orange County Register
for eighteen years, was let go with two weeks’ severance. It’s like
being in an exceedingly dull, slow version of Agatha Christie’s “And
Then There Were None.” You could
argue that classical critics are an endangered species because the art
form has lost its place in mainstream culture. Indeed, we no longer live
in a world where the conductor Sarah Caldwell could make the cover of Time.
Yet critic-free cities still have well-attended opera houses and
orchestras, which loom large in local cultural economies. Last season,
in Dallas, I witnessed a sold-out house for the première of Jake
Heggie’s opera “Great Scott.” Not long before that, in Houston, Wagner’s
“Die Walküre” drew a capacity crowd. 

Monday, March 13, 2017

A Visit to Sri Lanka and Eezham: Jaffna Tourist: Eelam trip by GRaa

5. டாட்டா யாழ்ப்பாணம் | மாணிக்க மாதுளை முத்துகள்

The Cult of ‘Zelda: Majora’s Mask’

The Cult of ‘Zelda: Majora’s Mask’



"Zelda: Majora's Mask" is the odd bird in the beloved video game
franchise. The apocalyptic storyline doesn't quite mesh with the rest of
the series, but that tone has spawned a dark cult all its own. A cult
that "spawned" a unsettling fan-made storyline with dreadful connections
to the online suicide of a 12-year-old girl late last year. 

Where Did All the Investigative Journalism Go? - Reason.com

Where Did All the Investigative Journalism Go? - Reason.com
Democracy's Detectives | Stanford Computational Journalism Lab

I invented the web. Here are three things we need to change to save it | Tim Berners-Lee | Technology | The Guardian

Through collaboration with – or coercion of – companies, governments are also increasingly watching our every move online and passing extreme laws that trample on our rights to privacy. In repressive regimes, it’s easy to see the harm that can be caused – bloggers can be arrested or killed, and political opponents can be monitored. But even in countries where we believe governments have citizens’ best interests at heart, watching everyone all the time is simply going too far. It creates a chilling effect on free speech and stops the web from being used as a space to explore important topics, such as sensitive health issues, sexuality or religion.

misinformation, or fake news, which is surprising, shocking, or designed to appeal to our biases, can spread like wildfire.


United States of Secrets | FRONTLINE | PBS

Part one goes inside Washington to piece together the secret political history of “The Program,” which began in the wake of Sept. 11 and continues today — even after the revelations of its existence by Edward Snowden. Part two explores the secret relationship between Silicon Valley and the National Security Agency: How have the government and tech companies worked together to gather and warehouse your data?



Sloshed on 30 percent profit margins, the news media went on a
drunkard's tear over the final three decades of the 20th century. Some
publishers, such as Gannett, spent their loot acquiring more newspapers.
The Boston Globe blew a portion of its windfall on foreign
bureaus, establishing its first in the early 1970s and eventually
expanding to five. Newspapers everywhere expanded regional and national
bureaus, sprouted additional sections, added color printing, hired more
journalists, and boosted circulation as the money bender continued.



Almost every news outlet—print or broadcast—spent heavily on
investigative journalism, producing a scoop renaissance. The Johnny
Deadlines dug deep to bust crooked cops, call out polluting
corporations, and expose criminal justice outrages. Health care fraud,
banking hijinks, payoffs, bribes, and government waste got a full press
airing.


Democracy's Detectives: The Economics of Investigative Reporting, by James T. Hamilton, Harvard University Press, 368 pages, $35

The decolonisation of the mind is among the greatest challenges today's Indians have to face.

The need for a museum on British colonisation of India | India | Al Jazeera



colonial atrocities.


This famous monument, built between 1906 and 1921,
stands testimony to the glorification of the British Raj in India. It
is time, I argued, that it be converted to serve as a reminder of what
was done to India by the British, who conquered one of the richest
countries in the world (27 percent of global gross domestic product in
1700) and reduced it to, after over two centuries of looting and
exploitation, one of the poorest, most diseased and most illiterate
countries on Earth by the time they left in 1947.