Thursday, February 23, 2017

Digital Privacy is the Wild West - Tim Mitchell

Digital Privacy is the Wild West - Tim Mitchell



The U.S. isn’t alone in this. Canada also reserves the right to demand
access to your devices during an attempted border crossing, and as a Quebec man found out a couple of years ago, refusing to provide a device password is a crime in itself. Israel has had similar cases in the past,
in which travelers were asked to log in to provide border agents access
to their data. Word of these incidents has led some folks to create travel-only email accounts, or to simply leave their devices behind altogether.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Hackers who took control of PC microphones siphon >600 GB from 70 targets | Ars Technica

Hackers who took control of PC microphones siphon >600 GB from 70 targets | Ars Technica



The operation uses malware to capture audio recordings of conversations, screen shots, documents, and passwords, according to a blog post published last week by security firm CyberX. Targets are initially infected using malicious Microsoft Word documents sent in phishing e-mails.

Seatbelt Learning with Uncle Buck | Backyard Data Science

Seatbelt Learning with Uncle Buck | Backyard Data Science



I determine what I need to know, and I make a syllabus of the “big rocks” of the topic in OneNote. I do that by a quick survey of materials, asking experts, and haunting various Stackoverflow and
other boards on the topic. I quickly note the things I see mentioned
most often, think about what I know already and what I need to know.
That information creates my search topics.

9 Rules For Emailing From Google Exec Eric Schmidt | Time.com

9 Rules For Emailing From Google Exec Eric Schmidt | Time.com



xcerpted from the book HOW GOOGLE WORKS by Eric Schmidt and Jonathan Rosenberg, with Alan Eagle. 

Monday, February 20, 2017

Reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber — Susan J. Fowler

Reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber — Susan J. Fowler



On my last day at Uber, I calculated the percentage of women who were
still in the org. Out of over 150 engineers in the SRE teams, only 3%
were women. 

Where the World’s Wealthiest Invest Their Billions - The New York Times

Where the World’s Wealthiest Invest Their Billions - The New York Times



When Mr. Premji was at Stanford University, his father, who started the
company, died, and he left college to take it over. At 23, he became
chief executive. He diversified the Mumbai-based company’s offerings
into soap and baby care products. In 1981, he ventured into information
technology. The company boomed through the 1980s and ’90s, and in 2000
the renamed Wipro went public in New York. 



“Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you
and me. They possess and enjoy early, and it does something to them,
makes them soft where we are hard, and cynical where we are trustful, in
a way that, unless you were born rich, it is very difficult to
understand. They think, deep in their hearts, that they are better than
we are because we had to discover the compensations and refuges of life
for ourselves. Even when they enter deep into our world or sink below
us, they still think that they are better than we

are. They are different. ”



F. Scott Fitzgerald

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Self and Identity | Noba

Self and Identity | Noba



For human beings, the self is what happens when “I” encounters “Me.” The
central psychological question of selfhood, then, is this: How does a
person apprehend and understand who he or she is? 

  • Explain the basic idea of reflexivity in human selfhood—how the “I” encounters and makes sense of itself (the “Me”).
  • Describe fundamental distinctions between three different perspectives on the self: the self as actor, agent, and author.
  • Describe how a sense of self as a social actor emerges around the age of 2 years and how it develops going forward.
  • Describe the development of the self’s sense of motivated agency from the emergence of the child’s theory of mind to the articulation of life goals and values in adolescence and beyond.
  • Define the term narrative identity, and explain what psychological and cultural functions narrative identity serves.



The Big Word in 'Ulysses' | by Richard Ellmann | The New York Review of Books

Our gratitude to Professor Gabler and his associates is not only for the clear text which occupies the right-hand pages. It is even more for the genetic text which occupies the left-hand pages. A reader who has mastered its diacritical marks can see instantly at which stage of manuscript or typescript, or at which set of the six proofs from Darantiere, particular changes were made. It will now be possible to study the history of the composition of the text without rushing from volume to volume of the Joyce archive, since the computer, expertly programmed by Professor Gabler, has done this for us.

For the purposes of interpretation, perhaps the most significant of the thousands of small changes in Gabler’s text has to do with the question that Stephen puts to his mother at the climax of the “Circe” episode, itself the climax of the novel. Stephen is appalled by his mother’s ghost, but like Ulysses he seeks information from her.

No one reading Ulysses from 1922 to the present can have been unaware that the text was faulty. It was difficult to be sure whether a given extravagance was a flourish of genius or an aberration of the typist or typesetter. Those humble functionaries should not be derided, for Joyce was idiosyneratic in the presentation of his work on the page as well as in the construction of its sentences and half-sentences. Mistakes were inevitable. Soon after Sylvia Beach published the first printing of the first edition on February 2, 1922, Joyce gathered together a list of errata. It was by no means complete. In 1932 his friend Stuart Gilbert, who had become aware of many more errors as he assisted with a translation of the book into French, corrected the text for the Odyssey Press edition published in Hamburg. Not all his changes had Joyce’s explicit authorization, however. Finally, in 1936, Joyce reread the book before it was published in London by the Bodley Head. After that year there is a long history of publishers with varying degrees of conscientiousness trying to correct misprints, and quite often adding more. A famous instance is the final dot at the end of the penultimate chapter. This was assumed to be a flyspeck and dropped, when in fact it was the obscure yet indispensable answer to the precise question, “Where?”




The Psychological Self as Actor, Agent, and Author - May 07, 2013

The psychological self may be construed as a reflexive arrangement of the subjective “I” and the constructed “Me,” evolving and expanding over the human life course. The psychological self begins life as a social actor, construed in terms of performance traits and social roles. By the end of childhood, the self has become a motivated agent, too, as personal goals, motives, values, and envisioned projects for the future become central features of how the I conceives of the Me. A third layer of selfhood begins to form in the adolescent and emerging adulthood years, when the self as autobiographical author aims to construct a story of the Me, to provide adult life with broad purpose and a dynamic sense of temporal continuity. An integrative theory that envisions the psychological self as a developing I–Me configuration of actor, agent, and author helps to synthesize a wide range of conceptions and findings on the self from social, personality, cognitive, cultural, and developmental psychology and from sociology and other social sciences. The actor–agent–author framework also sheds new light on studies of self-regulation, self-esteem, self-continuity, and the relationship between self and culture.

The “Mirror of the Self” Test | On Luminous Grounds

Suppose you and I are discussing this matter in a coffee shop. I look around on the table for things to use in an experiment. There is a bottle of ketchup on the table and, perhaps, an old-fashioned salt shaker. I ask you: “Which one of these is more like your own self?” Of course, the question appears slightly absurd. You might legitimately say, “It has no sensible answer.” But suppose I insist on the question, and you, to humor me, agree to pick one of the two: whichever one seems closer to representing you, your own self, in your totality.

Aristotle's Rhetoric (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Rhetoric as a Counterpart to Dialectic



Friday, February 17, 2017

Eugenie Bouchard breaks down her date with Twitter fan John Goehrke

Eugenie Bouchard breaks down her date with Twitter fan John Goehrke



Twitter may be
the online playground for presidents and trolls but it can now also give
hope to young men who might want to date
Sports Illustrated
swimsuit models. Tennis player Eugenie Bouchard lost a random Twitter
bet when the Patriots won the Super Bowl and honored it by taking the
lucky winner to an NBA basketball game. #luckydate

Thursday, February 16, 2017

My Way Day - 17th Feb, 2017 | Days Of The Year

My Way Day - 17th Feb, 2017 | Days Of The Year

Big Oil’s Grip on California | The Nation

Big Oil’s Grip on California | The Nation



 In
America’s greenest state, the industry has spent $122 million in the
past six years to shape regulation and legislation. It wins more than
you think.

They inspire us, comfort us, and remind us how life moves on

What We Can Learn from Trees

When a Pillar of the Fourth Estate Rests on a Trump-Murdoch Axis - The New York Times

When a Pillar of the Fourth Estate Rests on a Trump-Murdoch Axis - The New York Times



Assessing editorial independence at The Wall Street Journal when Trump and Rupert Murdoch are friends. Ivanka Trump oversees a $300 million trust for Murdoch

Catholic Church paid A$276m to abuse victims in Australia - BBC News

Catholic Church paid A$276m to abuse victims in Australia - BBC News



Spotlight in Australia: An Australian commission revealed that the Australian Catholic Church paid out $213 million in three thousand child sexual abuse
claims spanning 1980 to 2015. The commission believes that the number
of child sexual abuse incidences are likely significantly higher and
that seven percent of the nation’s Catholic priests had abused children.

India Launches 104 Satellites From a Single Rocket, Ramping Up a Space Race - The New York Times

India Launches 104 Satellites From a Single Rocket, Ramping Up a Space Race - The New York Times



India Fires Off 104 Miniature Satellites:
India staked its claim as a major player in the space race by launching
a world record-setting 104 satellites from a single rocket. Each
satellite costs a mere $10 million and weighs less than 10 pounds. India
is taking the
final frontier seriously and achieving results. They successfully sent a spacecraft to Mars in 2014.

Silent Spring—I - The New Yorker

Silent Spring—I - The New Yorker



the term “biocide” would be more appropriate than “insecticide”—all the
more appropriate because the whole process of spraying poisons on the
earth seems to have been caught up in an endless spiral. Since the late
nineteen-forties, when DDT began to be used widely, a process of
escalation has been going on in which ever more toxic chemicals must be
found. This has happened because insects, in a triumphant vindication of
Darwin’s principle of the survival of the fittest

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Employers are using sentiment analysis and analyzing your emails and Slack chats to see if you're happy at work — Quartz

Employers are using sentiment analysis and analyzing your emails and Slack chats to see if you're happy at work — Quartz



AIR, a Tokyo-based software company, is marketing software that scans
conversations on workplace communication tool Slack to gauge team
morale. Their product, called Vibe, looks for keywords and emoji, then
sorts a team’s mood into five emotions: happiness, irritation,
disapproval, disappointment, and stress. There’s even a bot that will
notify managers of real-time changes in team morale.

Queens of the Stoned Age | GQ

Queens of the Stoned Age | GQ



"The Green Angels, she tells me, are selling a fantasy of an attractive,
well-educated, presentable young woman who wants to get you high -- a
slightly more risqué Avon lady. Not all of the Angels are working
models, but they are all young and attractive. In eight years, they have never been busted by the cops. The explanation is simple: Good-looking girls don't get searched." GQ's Suketu Mehta on the many advantages of being an attractive weed dealer

WordPress Used as Command and Control Server in 2016 Election Hack

WordPress Used as Command and Control Server in 2016 Election Hack



 Department of Homeland Security released a report [PDF link] containing updated
and broader analysis of Russian civilian and military intelligence
organization’s attempts to interfere with the 2016 US election.

The clock is ticking for Spotify - BBC News

The clock is ticking for Spotify - BBC News

Friday, February 10, 2017

Hope for Revolution, Art and Change: Adonis | Yale Press Log

Hope for Revolution, Art and Change: Adonis | Yale Press Log

Banipal (UK) Magazine of Modern Arab Literature - Book Reviews - Adonis: Selected Poems





In “The Banished,” originally published in 1957, the speaker worries
about displacement, remembers, “On the first day of the year/ our groans
said to us/ …‘Your country is no longer here.’/ We who rebelled against
the intruder/ who were destroyed and banished.” The work of the poet as
a young man is sometimes described as angry. A 1968 poem, “A Mirror for
the Twentieth Century,” certainly shows a desperate frustration: “A
coffin that wears the face of a child/…a stone/ breathing inside the
lungs of a madman/ …This is the twentieth century.” In a poem that
begins with September 11, however, he notes both his wide and limited
effectiveness as an artist, saying, “You can, poet/ poke your nose in
everything/ and shove what concerns you into the nose of your era.” His
anger and critiques, though passionate, always stem from a real wish to
see change and rejuvenation, making him truly a poet for our era.



Adonis: Selected Poems, translated by Khaled Mattawa, expresses many of his social views.



 

Wednesday, February 08, 2017

Thomas Hargrove is building software to identify trends in unsolved murders using data nobody’s bothered with before

Serial Killers Should Fear This Algorithm - Bloomberg



"His innovation was to teach a computer to spot trends in unsolved
murders, using publicly available information that no one, including
anyone in law enforcement, had used before. This makes him, in a manner
of speaking, the Billy Beane of murder." There are a lot of murders in
America. And, over the past few decades, a lot more of those murders
have gone unsolved. You'd like to think there's some trove of data being
crunched by law enforcement agencies across the country to find any
clue that can and will be used against the perpetrators of what could be
multiple homicides. Thomas Hargrove found out there wasn't. So he
starting building one. From Bloomberg: Serial Killers Should Fear This Algorithm. Facts, science, data. Three things that should only be feared if you're a murderer. 

Couldn’t get into Ivy league IRL? Here are 250 Free Online Courses from Ivy League Colleges

Couldn’t get into Ivy league IRL? Here are 250 Free Online Courses from Ivy League Colleges



Modern & Contemporary American Poetry (“ModPo”)

China (Part 1): Political and Intellectual Foundations: From the Sage Kings to Confucius and the Legalists

China (Part 2): The Creation and End of Centralized Empire

China (Part 3): Cosmopolitan Tang: Aristocratic Culture

China (Part 4): Literati China: Examinations and Neo-Confucianism

Masterpieces of World Literature
Harvard University via edX

Religious Literacy: Traditions and Scriptures
Harvard University via edX

Buddhism Through Its Scriptures
Harvard University via edX

Visualizing Japan (1850s-1930s): Westernization, Protest, Modernity
Harvard University via edX

American Capitalism: A History
Cornell University via edX

Ancient Philosophy: Plato & His Predecessors
University of Pennsylvania via Coursera

Moralities of Everyday Life
Yale University via Coursera

 

The New Face of American Unemployment

The New Face of American Unemployment



As the US labor force reaches so-called full employment, a new set of
problems is preventing as many as 20 million Americans from entering the
workplace. Bloomberg presents five unique stories behind the
statistics.

Sunday, February 05, 2017

The Data That Turned the World Upside Down - Motherboard

The Data That Turned the World Upside Down - Motherboard



Anyone who has not spent the last five years living on another planet
will be familiar with the term Big Data. Big Data means, in essence,
that everything we do, both on and offline, leaves digital traces. Every
purchase we make with our cards, every search we type into Google,
every movement we make when our mobile phone is in our pocket, every
"like" is stored. Especially every "like." 

Psychologist Michal Kosinski developed a method
to analyze people in minute detail based on their Facebook activity.
Did a similar tool help propel Donald Trump to victory? Two reporters
from Zurich-based Das Magazin went data-gathering.​

Elizabeth Blackburn on the telomere effect: Its about keeping healthier for longer

Elizabeth Blackburn on the telomere effect: Its about keeping healthier for longer



If you think of your chromosomes – which carry your genetic material –
as shoelaces, telomeres are the little protective tips at the end. They
are made of repeating short sequences of DNA sheathed in special
proteins. 


The Nobel winner says keeping telomeres – the ends of our chromosomes – in prime condition can stave off diseases associated with ageing

His Doctors Were Stumped. Then He Took Over. - The New York Times

His Doctors Were Stumped. Then He Took Over. - The New York Times



They called him the Beast.
David Fajgenbaum was the fittest of his friends at the University of Pennsylvania’s medical school, a 6-foot-3 gym addict and former quarterback at Georgetown.
His mammoth hands seemed more suited to spiraling footballs than the
fine fingerwork a doctor-in-training might need. He had endurance to
match, taking multiple hits and returning to the field to play on.

Even Good-Guy Student Loan Startups Still Favor the Rich

Even Good-Guy Student Loan Startups Still Favor the Rich



Student-loan refinancing is one of Silicon Valley’s hottest new
mini-sectors, with a fresh crop of startups leveraging buzzy marketing
and proprietary algorithms in a race to reshape the loan. But despite
the hype, only the top tier of graduates qualifies. Can technology ever
change that? 


Most Internet traffic comes from bots, not people - Axios

Most Internet traffic comes from bots, not people - Axios




A new
report
shows that more than half of Internet traffic comes from bots —
software applications that perform automated tasks for almost anything
you can think of on the internet.




Bots are so prevalent in the digital media ecosystem that even the most sophisticated publishers can't avoid them.

Not ‘Lone Wolves’ After All: How ISIS Guides World’s Terror Plots From Afar - NYTimes.com

Not ‘Lone Wolves’ After All: How ISIS Guides World’s Terror Plots From Afar - NYTimes.com



When the Islamic State identified a promising young
recruit willing to carry out an attack in one of India’s major tech
hubs, the group made sure to arrange everything down to the bullets he
needed to kill victims.

For 17 months, terrorist
operatives guided the recruit, a young engineer named Mohammed Ibrahim
Yazdani, through every step of what they planned to be the Islamic
State’s first strike on Indian soil.

Friday, February 03, 2017

The ascent of Donald Trump has proved Neil Postman’s argument in Amusing Ourselves to Death was right. Here’s what we can do about it

My dad predicted Trump in 1985 – it's not Orwell, he warned, it's Brave New World | Media | The Guardian



media references to Amusing Ourselves to Death,
a book written by my late father, Neil Postman, which anticipated back
in 1985 so much about what has become of our current public discourse.



Paste Magazine asked: “Did Neil Postman Predict the Rise of Trump and Fake News?



there were two landmark dystopian novels written by brilliant British cultural critics – Brave New World by Aldous Huxley and Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell

Team Orwell is rooting for the end of the world

High on Dystopia | Jessa Crispin



Maybe we all just decided it was cooler to be George Orwell (who came
from money) than H. G. Wells (who did not)—cooler to be the smirker
saying, “Pah, it’ll never work,” than to be the kid chirping, “Here is
what we can do.” The H. G. Wells we find profiled in Krishan Kumar’s Utopia and Anti-Utopia in Modern Times was someone who suffered greatly and wanted to help prevent the suffering of future generations. 

Did a violin teacher from Plano, Texas solve the world's greatest classical music mystery?

Breaking Elgar’s Enigma | New Republic



In 2006, Padgett was
part of an orchestra preparing for a concert dedicated to the “mysteries and
hidden messages” of Edward Elgar’s Variations on an Original Theme, Enigma, Op. 36. The Enigma Variations,
as it is commonly called, is one of Britain’s most beloved classical music
works. Written between 1898 and 1899, it features 14 variations, 
one of which has
become a kind of British national elegy, played at Princess Diana’s funeral and 
performed annually at the country’s Remembrance
Sunday ceremony for fallen soldiers.