Monday, June 27, 2016

Deep Learning Isn’t a Dangerous Magic Genie. It’s Just Math | WIRED

Deep Learning Isn’t a Dangerous Magic Genie. It’s Just Math | WIRED



Deep learning is a subfield of machine learning, which is a vibrant
research area in artificial intelligence, or AI. Abstractly, machine
learning is an approach to approximating functions based on a collection
of data points.



applications ranging from self-driving cars and speech recognition to anticipating airfare fluctuations

AI, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning: A Primer – Andreessen Horowitz

AI, Deep Learning, and Machine Learning: A Primer – Andreessen Horowitz

The BBC and Virtual Reality - BBC R&D

The BBC and Virtual Reality - BBC R&D



How the world's oldest national broadcaster is experimenting with VR, AR and 360 video.

The Ghost (Writer) in the Machine - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Ghost (Writer) in the Machine - The Chronicle of Higher Education



Dickens wrote with a feather quill. T.S. Eliot used a fountain pen engraved with his initials. Jack Kerouac typed On the Road on a portable Underwood.


The technology of writing — how words move from an author’s mind to
the page — has improved drastically over the years. Perhaps the biggest
advance came toward the end of the 20th century with the rise of the
personal computer, allowing authors to easily revise without having to
rewrite.


Goodbye, Wite-Out. Hello, delete key.



Matthew G. Kirschenbaum explores those anxieties in his new book, Track Changes: A Literary History of Word Processing (Harvard University Press)

It’s Happening: A Robot Escaped a Lab in Russia and Made a Dash For Freedom - Nextgov.com

It’s Happening: A Robot Escaped a Lab in Russia and Made a Dash For Freedom - Nextgov.com



Robots are being beaten down by their human overlords, even as we teach them to get stronger. Now, they’re starting to break free.







A robot in Russia escaped from a research lab in the town of Perm yesterday, June 15, reports the BBC.

Stop saying learning to code is easy. - Scott Hanselman

Stop saying learning to code is easy. - Scott Hanselman



Ryunosuke Akutagawa in focus | The Japan Times

Ryunosuke Akutagawa in focus | The Japan Times



one recent landmark Sekiguchi pointed out was “Rashomon and Seventeen
Other Stories,” which was translated by former Harvard professor (and
translator of several works by Haruki Murakami) Jay Rubin and published
by Penguin in 2006. “This book is a very ambitious work,” he said.
“Rubin succeeded in translating 19 stories, including “Chugi”
(“Loyalty”) and “Negi” (“Green Onions”) which researchers had considered
impossible to translate.”



In the introduction he wrote for that book, Murakami says he first
read stories by Akutagawa when he was in elementary school — some in
textbooks. Then, in considering what makes the author stand out so much,
Murakami cites in particular the excellence of his style and the sheer
quality of his use of Japanese.

Sunday, June 26, 2016

AI, Apple and Google — Benedict Evans

AI, Apple and Google — Benedict Evans



fundamental challenge for Siri, Google Assistant or any chat bot (as I discussed here) - what can you ask?



how Google Translate works on mobile - the training is done in advance in the cloud but the analysis is local. Apple says it's doing the same for Apple Photos - 'it turns out we don't need your photos of mountains to train a system to recognize mountains.

How the Wormhole Decade (2000-2010) Changed the World | Sally Blount | Pulse | LinkedIn

How the Wormhole Decade (2000-2010) Changed the World | Sally Blount | Pulse | LinkedIn



Think 1999—what were the most pressing issues of the day? Perhaps Y2K
and the dot-com bubble? Remember 6% interest rates, the flip phone,
Sony Walkman, Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin, and when the French franc
was still legal tender?


No one would have bet that within a decade Arthur Andersen, Lehman
Brothers, and Bear Sterns would be gone; global interest rates would be
at zero and stuck there; not to mention that social media, iTunes, and
the Internet of things would be ubiquitous; and privacy as we knew it
would be over.

Prisma uses AI to turn your photos into graphic novel fodder double quick | TechCrunch

Prisma uses AI to turn your photos into graphic novel fodder double quick | TechCrunch



A new iOS app, called Prisma,
is using deep learning algorithms to turn smartphone photos into
stylized artworks based on different artwork/graphical styles.

How American Politics Became So Ineffective - The Atlantic

How American Politics Became So Ineffective - The Atlantic



Astonishingly, the 2016 Republican presidential race has been dominated
by a candidate who is not, in any meaningful sense, a Republican.
According to registration records, since 1987 Donald Trump has been a
Republican, then an independent, then a Democrat, then a Republican,
then “I do not wish to enroll in a party,” then a Republican; he has
donated to both parties; he has shown loyalty to and affinity for
neither. 

Invisibilia: Your Personality Isn't As Set In Stone As You Think : Shots - Health News : NPR

Invisibilia: Your Personality Isn't As Set In Stone As You Think : Shots - Health News : NPR



when Walter Mischel
sat down to do his literature review, he didn't find much support for
the idea that personality is stable. "I expected to find that the
assumptions would be justified," he says, "and then I started reading
study after study that found that actually the data didn't support it."

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Lit - Tamil Magazines - 01 June 2016

Vikatan Thadam - விகடன் தடம் - Issue date - 01 June 2016



போர் இன்னும் ஓயவில்லை!
ஃபேஸ்புக்கும் தனிமையும்
கன்னட இலக்கியமும் தமிழிலக்கியமும்  

குமுதம் தீராநதி:  ஜூன்- 2016











“இன்றைய இலக்கியத்துக்கு கறாரான விமர்சகர்கள் பத்து பேர் வேண்டும்!” - பிரபஞ்சன்



தொடர்கள்


ஓவியம்






Local news isn't dead. We just need to stop killing it. - Columbia Journalism Review

Local news isn't dead. We just need to stop killing it. - Columbia Journalism Review



if you talk to many local editors and publishers, you’ll hear a long
list of reasons why local hasn’t transitioned effectively to a digital
world: We should have charged readers from the start! Google is
stealing our content! Aggregators are stealing our content! We can’t
compete with social media! Unethical ad blockers are killing us!
Clickbait!
 The common theme of most of these statements is, “It’s not our fault.”




But it is.



We had plenty of time to adapt to the new digital world. Newspapers have been online since 1995. Google was founded in 1996. Craigslist launched on the Web that same year. Facebook was founded in 2004, Twitter in 2006, and Snapchat in 2012. If you look at some of the more editorially focused startups, Vox began operations as SBNation in 2003, Huffington Post and Mashable launched in 2005, BuzzFeed was formed in 2006, and Mic
began life as PolicyMic in 2011. There was nothing stopping media
companies—who were there before all of those companies—from being the
innovators. And, almost completely, we missed the boat.

How Content Marketers Can Tell Better Stories with Data

How Content Marketers Can Tell Better Stories with Data



When Grant Thornton published its latest study on women in corporate leadership,
it prominently noted the fact that close to a third of companies have
no women in senior management. When Vision Critical released What Social Media Analytics Can’t Tell You About Your Customers, we emphasized the point that 85% of what you hear online comes from less than 30% of your social media audience. 

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

AI app that sees (and hears) everything

RedEye can remember who you've met and even what you said to them | Daily Mail Online



RedEye
assists mobile CPU/GPU systems by replacing the image sensor, nearly
halving the system energy consumption by moving convolutional processing
from the digital domain in the analog domain.
In
the case of machine learning, the application uses 'convolutional
neural network,' an algorithmic structure inspired by the organization
of the animal visual cortex.
The
technology can recognize objects—like cats, dogs, keys, phones,
computers, faces, etc.—without actually looking at the image itself.

Monday, June 20, 2016

“Opaque couché” has been called the world’s ugliest color. That’s in the eye of the beholder, though.

In Defense of the World’s Ugliest Color, “Opaque Couché”

Tamil makkal matram- Kodai kondattam

Upcoming



Events at Lowell 

The Trump Issue - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The Trump Issue - The Chronicle of Higher Education




How
did Donald Trump’s candidacy happen? What ideas has he upended? How is
academe responding? What does his candidacy mean for the future of
democracy? We asked scholars from a variety of disciplines to weigh in.



Trump 101

Michael Kazin, Jill Lepore, Harvey Mansfield, Alan Wolfe, and others offer an election-year curriculum




I, Donald

By Matthew Meyer Thucydides and Plato warned us about this guy




The Jerk’s Political Moment

By Aaron James We take pleasure in Trump's clowning, nevermind the civic stakes




Trump and the Problem of History

By Ian P. Beacock Historical analogies should expand our political imagination, not foreclose the future



The 49 best free websites and apps to learn something new — Life Learning — Medium

The 49 best free websites and apps to learn something new — Life Learning — Medium

Saturday, June 18, 2016

Psychic powers have long been the realm of fantasy and science fiction

But today, researchers are getting closer to developing technology-aided telepathy. Learn how the process works, and if you will someday be able to talk to your honey using only your | Big Think



Consider a monkey who could control a computer with its thoughts, and one human telepathically controlling the movements of another. Other experiments used “organic computers” with the brains of several chimps or rats all linked together

Nanjil Nadan in Uyir Ezhuthu on Music: Classical, Carnatic, Folk: Arts & Listening

எத்திசைச் செலினும் அத்திசை இசையே! | நாஞ்சில்நாடன்

How is Vikatans' Thadam Magazine? Is it Timepass Vikadan?

“பெரியார், அம்பேத்கர், ஜெயகாந்தன், புதுமைப்பித்தனோடு சிரிப்பு நடிகர் வடிவேலு; விகடனின் தடம் யாரைக் கேவலப்படுத்துகிறது?” – சமூகத்தின் பட்டகம்

The Photo Desk on Flipboard

The Photo Desk on Flipboard



Wolfgang Buttress' sculpture 'The Hive' at Kew Gardens in London. 

A fish trapped inside a transparent jellyfish in the Pacific Ocean off
the coast of Byron Bay in Australia. Tim Samuel Photography

Monday, June 13, 2016

Teenage psychology: Risks and rewards

How “likes” affect teenagers’ brains | The Economist







It
is well established that teenagers take risks more readily in the
presence of their peers. But peers’ influence can travel even through
something as apparently trivial as the “like” button in social media. A
new study looked at teenagers’ brains as they perused a fake Instagram
feed. It found that photos depicting risky behaviours with many “likes”
lowered adolescent self-control while simultaneously triggering a reward response

Can a Neuroscientist Understand Donkey Kong, Let Alone a Brain? - The Atlantic

Can a Neuroscientist Understand Donkey Kong, Let Alone a Brain? - The Atlantic



Two researchers applied common neuroscience techniques to a classic
computer chip. Their results are a wake-up call for the whole field.



The human brain contains 86 billion neurons, underlies all of humanity’s scientific and artistic endeavours, and has been repeatedly described as the most complex object in the known universe. By contrast, the MOS 6502 microchip contains 3510 transistors, runs Space Invaders,
and wouldn’t even be the most complex object in my pocket. We know very
little about how the brain works, but we understand the chip
completely.

So, Eric Jonas and Konrad Kording wondered, what would happen if they studied the chip in the style of neuroscientists?

Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person - The New York Times

Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person - The New York Times



we have a bewildering array of problems that emerge when we try to get
close to others. We seem normal only to those who don’t know us very
well. In a wiser, more self-aware society than our own, a standard
question on any early dinner date would be: “And how are you crazy?”



Compatibility is an achievement of love; it must not be its precondition. 

Friday, June 10, 2016

Bharathiyar Book by A Raa Venkatachalapathi: Chalapathy on Copyright & Trademark

A contrarian world: Bharathi: From Being Copyrighted to Belonging to the People. Chalapathi's, Artful Summary. Merits and Flaws. ('கவிஞனும் காப்புரிமையும்')

Movie written by algorithm turns out to be hilarious and intense | Ars Technica

Movie written by algorithm turns out to be hilarious and intense | Ars Technica



For Sunspring's exclusive debut on Ars, we talked to the filmmakers about collaborating with an AI.

Welcome to Larry Page’s Secret Flying Car Factories - Bloomberg

Welcome to Larry Page’s Secret Flying Car Factories - Bloomberg



With Zee.Aero and Kitty Hawk, the Google co-founder looks to the skies.

How “Silicon Valley” Nails Silicon Valley - The New Yorker

How “Silicon Valley” Nails Silicon Valley - The New Yorker



On “Silicon Valley,“ events like Code,
organized by Kara Swisher, become realistic fiction. Here, Swisher and
Walt Mossberg interview Elon Musk, in real life, and the character Gavin
Belson, on the show.

Computational Stippling: Can Machines Do as Well as Humans?—Wolfram Blog

Computational Stippling: Can Machines Do as Well as Humans?—Wolfram Blog

Wednesday, June 08, 2016

Mental health: why we're all sick under neoliberalism | openDemocracy

Mental health: why we're all sick under neoliberalism | openDemocracy



We don't understand mental health, allocating the label only to those
who are struggling. So good mental health, and its political causes,
become invisible. An introduction to Transformation's new series on the politics of mental health. Content warning: anxiety, suicidal thoughts.

Sunday, June 05, 2016